Cyber arms dealer taps new iPhone software bug affecting most versions

A cyber surveillance company based in Israel developed a tool to break into Apple iPhones with a novel technique that has been in use since at least February, internet security watchdog group Citizen Lab said on Monday.

The discovery is important because of the critical nature of the vulnerability, which requires no user interaction and affects all versions of Apple’s iOS, OSX, and watchOS, except for those updated on Monday.

The tool developed by the Israeli firm, named NSO Group, defeats security systems designed by Apple in recent years.

Apple said it fixed the vulnerability in Monday’s software update, confirming Citizen Lab’s finding.

In a statement to Reuters, NSO did not confirm or deny that it was behind the technique, saying only that it would “continue to provide intelligence and law enforcement agencies around the world with life-saving technologies to fight terror and crime.”

Citizen Lab said it found the malware on the phone of an unnamed Saudi activist and that the phone had been infected with spyware in February. It is unknown how many other users may have been infected.

The intended targets would not have to click on anything for the attack to work. Researchers said they did not believe there would be any visible indication that a hack had occurred.

The vulnerability lies in how iMessage automatically renders images. IMessage has been repeatedly targeted by NSO and other cyber arms dealers, prompting Apple to update its architecture. But that upgrade has not fully protected the system.

Citizen Lab said multiple details in the malware overlapped with prior attacks by NSO, including some that were never publicly reported.

One process within the hack’s code was named “setframed,” the same name given in a 2020 infection of a device used by a journalist at Al Jazeera, the researchers found.

A record number of previously unknown attack methods, which can be sold for $1 million or more, have been revealed this year.

The attacks are labeled “zero-day” because software companies had zero days’ notice of the problem.

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