Country music legend, Charlie Daniels dies at 83

Charlie Daniels

American country music legend, Charlie Daniels, a country legend has died Monday at age 83, his rep said.

In a report by PageSix, Daniels, who was a Country Music Hall of Famer who collaborated with musical greats including Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Leonard Cohen, Bootsy Collins and more, died at a hospital in Hermitage, Tennessee, after he suffered a stroke, doctors said. He’s survived by his wife Hazel and son Charles Jr.

He previously experienced a mild stroke in January 2010 then had a heart pacemaker implanted in 2013. Daniels, a singer, guitarist and expert fiddler, continued to perform even with his health in decline in recent years, more recently with his side project, Beau Weevils.

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“Music plays a part in my daily life and it’s just the way I chose to make a living for 61 years now. It’s a blessing to walk onstage. I never take it for granted,” he told The Oklahoman last year.

The road warrior born in North Carolina got his start in the 50s and 60s as a session musician, producer and songwriter for bluegrass, folk and eventually southern rock songs. He co-wrote the song “It Hurts Me,” which was made famous by Presley in 1964. After moving to Nashville, Tennessee in 1967, he was employed as a session player on three Dylan albums — “Nashville Skyline,” “Self Portrait” and “New Morning.” He also sometimes played the fiddle behind Cohen.

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