Interpol to extradite flamboyant socialite Ray Hushpuppi to Nigeria

Hushpuppi

There are reported official confirmation that the popular and flamboyant Nigerian socialite arrested in Dubai, UAE, for fraud, Ray Hushpuppi will be extradited to Nigeria.

Hushpuppi whose real name is Raymond Igbalodely was arrested on Wednesday morning at his hotel apartment alongside his associates by operatives of Interpol and the FBI.

However, in an official statement credited to Head of Interpol in Nigeria, Commissioner of Police, Mr. Garba Umar, he said:

He said: “It is true that Hushpuppi was arrested by the INTERPOL. We are currently working on bringing him to Nigeria to face charges of fraud.

“Some of the offences were committed here in Nigeria and he has to answer for them. He is not alone in it; there are accomplices in the country who we are currently on their trail,” said the CP.

However, there were unconfirmed reports that Hushpuppi and his alleged gangs of Internet fraudsters have been extradited to the United States.

According to an eyewitnesses Dubai said Hushpuppi and his friend where ‘allegedly surrounded by the International police and FBI on the grounds of being fraud suspects’. Hushpuppi who said he will not come back to Nigeria has been accused of being an Internet fraudster because of his flamboyant and expensive lifestyles without a convincing business and source of his lavish lifestyle.

According to the unconfirmed charges by the Interpol, Hushpuppi’s Internet fraud gang were accused of exploiting COVID-19 benefits to scam the American government by diverting the benefits from the unemployed victims. The report alleged that the gang must have stolen over $35 million in unemployed benefits.

However, the latest reports suggested that Hushpuppi’s Internet fraud gang could have defrauded American states and taxpayers close to $100 million.

While he has never denied he was into Internet fraud, Hushpuppi has used social media, particularly, Instagram to taunt his critics. In one of his posts, he said “I wear people’s mortgage’, boasting of how rich he is.

While many people might be oblivious of the allegations against him, fresh facts have emerged on how Internet fraudsters are exploiting the devastating Novel Coronavirus pandemic outbreak in the U.S. to defraud unsuspecting Americans and state governments of several billions of dollars.

On Thursday, we reported that less than 48 hours his widely-reported arrest, America’s, tax agency, the IRS, issued more warnings that Americans could lose huge amounts of money to Internet scammers.

The IRS Criminal Investigation unit said in a statement that scammers are continuing to use the coronavirus pandemic as cover for schemes to steal personal information and money.

According to a statement released by the IRS Criminal Investigation unit has seen “a tremendous increase in phishing schemes utilizing emails, letters, texts and links.” The schemes typically use keywords such as “Corona Virus,” “COVID-19,” and “Stimulus” in phishing email subject lines.

“These schemes are blasted to large numbers of people,” the IRS added.

A scammer might try to get you to pay a fee to get your stimulus payment. Other tactics they may also use include tricking people into giving them their Social Security number, bank account or government benefits debit card account number.

The IRS will never contact you by phone, email, text message, or social media with information about your stimulus payment. Nor will it ask you for your Social Security number, bank account, or government benefits debit card account number.

Cybersecurity firm Check Point software said this week that it is seeing a stimulus payment scam that purports to come from the World Health Organization with the subject line “Stimulus Package for you” promising large sums of money. New IRS scams are popping up as well.

During May, more than 1,200 new Stimulus/Relief package related websites were registered, 3 percent (37) of them were found to be malicious and another 2.5 percent (30) were found to be suspicious, Check Point said.

Secret Service Assistant Director Michael D’Ambrosio testified this week that coronavirus-related fraud could lead to $30 billion in federal relief funds being stolen by criminals.

“We are entering the ‘Post COVID Era’ relative to cybersecurity, meaning the attack volume and vectors are shifting as the attackers are learning new ways to gain malicious access to the public’s personal information or finances,” Mark Ostrowski, Head of Engineering, Check Point Office of the CTO, told Fox News.

This follows a report from Check Point in April, where it said new website domain registrations soared in the wake of the $2.2 trillion stimulus package, with nearly 30 percent found to be suspicious out of the 2,000 or so new domains registered in March.

During the week leading up to April 16, Google saw more than 18 million daily malware and phishing emails related to COVID-19 scams on top of the 240 million daily spam messages it sees related to the pandemic.

The IRS pointed to other COVID-19 scams it is seeing, including fake at-home test kits, fake cures, vaccines, pills and advice on unproven treatments for COVID-19.

Another variety tries to sell medical supplies through fake shops, websites, social media accounts and email addresses. In these cases, unsuspecting buyers will never receive the product after paying for it.

Other COVID-19-related scams include fake charities to solicit donations and bogus “opportunities” to invest early in companies working on a vaccine for the disease, the IRS added.

However, the agency did not mention its involvement in the recent crackdown on Internet fraud suspects, particularly, the arrest of Hushpuppi in Dubai.

Eyewitnesses in Dubai said Hushpuppi and his friend where ‘allegedly surrounded by the International police and FBI on the grounds of being fraud suspects’. Hushpuppi who said he will not come back to Nigeria has been accused of being an Internet fraudster because of his flamboyant and expensive lifestyles without a convincing business and source of his lavish lifestyle.

According to the unconfirmed charges by the Interpol, Hushpuppi’s Internet fraud gang were accused of exploiting COVID-19 benefits to scam the American government by diverting the benefits from the unemployed victims. The report alleged that the gang must have stolen over $35 million in unemployed benefits.

Last year, Nigeria’s anti-corruption police, the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, EFCC, arrested Mompha, another Internet fraudster suspect who lives in Dubai for fraud in the region of several billions of Naira. MomphaMompha has been banned from travelling abroad while he stands trial in Nigeria for money laundering, fraud and operating an illegal bureau de change.