What will the AI revolution change in advertising?

What will the AI revolution change in advertising?

For many of us, the concept of artificial intelligence (AI) evades our understanding. As excusable as it is, we need to get up to speed.

This is because AI applications are taking over the jobs, disrupting industries and taking out big corporations who have held sway for decades.
However, in the marketing industry, we are more susceptible to the huge onslaught of AI and its impending takeover.
At SBI Media, we have outlined three areas where AI would disrupt or for the good of all, improve:
1. Creative design, analytics and placements: As more AI applications come into the mix, we would have fewer needs for art directors, video editors and graphic artists. This is because AI robots would smartly study customers, formulate communication plans and even create messages in real time to reach them.
As distant as this might sound, Google has already applied this to its Adwords platform. The system only needs key visuals, the rest is history and concepts. The robot can even execute AB testing to know which message converts what audience.
2. TV, Radio and everything ATL: For many media planners, particularly in this part of the world, many things are still manual. We even use historical data to determine where and how we choose and place messages.
As soon as the AI revolution enters the game, we would have a new era upon us. While it is a given that fewer hands would be needed. We would have less need for human intervention for basic/advanced data collection, analysis and actual action required. With Internet TV gaining grounds, we can know how the audience of a TV show grows and the highest period of viewership. Agencies can then bid for ads in real time as it is the case in digital advertising.
3. Customers would determine everything: The tradition has always been a boardroom setting where we determine what to produce and communicate to reach our customers. As the influence of advertising continues to wane, there would be a near-total shift in control to the customer.
For instance, smartphone companies carry out extensive research and development programmes to upgrade an older version of their devices in order to develop an upgrade for the global market. It is now more apparent that the opposite might be the case. Customers would determine what features they want in a phone and place orders for it. In the end, no two or three smartphones might look or work the same way. Marketing in such times would require a whole new level of understanding and competence.