South African parliament keeps Jacob Zuma in vote of no confidence

South African parliament keeps Jacob Zuma in vote of no confidence

South Africa’s national parliament has retained President Jacob Zuma through a process of a ‘vote of no confidence’.

The Parliament counted the vote with the YES vote 177 and 195 for a NO vote. The NO vote won the process by 21, a slimmer margin compared to earlier rounds of voting that the YES vote won.

The results of the votes to decide whether President Jacob Zuma should be removed over allegations of corruption and ‘state capture’ was brought by a coalition of opposition parties.

South Africa’s Police Minister, Fikile Mbalula, said at the parliament building said: “We will not leave power to stooges in the opposition. It is not a no confidence vote, it is a useless motion”. As a tone for the 2019 elections, he said: “We will wait for them in 2019”.

Julius Malema, the leader of the EFF, an opposition party said “We are tired of being demoralised, we are making progress. We are tired of the Guptas who are appointing ministers”

He said the opposition will continue to fight “We have not lost anything”.

While speaking in front of the parliament building, President Jacob Zuma said: “I want to say thank you to all of you. Those comrades who gave me their support. You came in your numbers that the ANC is back and more powerful”.

While slamming the opposition, Zuma said: “They believe they could use technicalities to take over the government in the parliament, it is not possible. We represent the majority of the people. They are using propaganda in the media to say we do not have a majority, he said”

Analysts said the African National Congress, ANC will get more damage to its images as the opposition will count on the close shave to galvanise negative sentiments against the party.

South Africa’s is Africa’s second largest economy and the most developed. The country has slipped into a recession in the second quarter of the year.

Trading on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, JSE, is expected to start on a back foot tomorrow as market sentiments tilted towards a removal of Jacob Zuma.